COVID-19 July 22 Update

Dear Neighbours,

  1. City Council Updates
    1. Local items
      1. TE26.58 - Traffic Control Signals and Turn Prohibitions - Dufferin Street and Lindsay Avenue
      2. MM35.1 -1117 Queen Street West - former Canada Post Building
      3. MM35.42 - Musician Rehearsal Spaces in the City of Toronto
      4. CC35.21 - 900 Dufferin Street - Official Plan Amendment and Zoning By-law Amendment Application - Request for Directions
      5. TE26.31 - City-initiated Bloor Street: St. Helen's Avenue to Perth Avenue Planning Framework
      6. GL24.13 - Acquisition of 10 Properties on Old Weston Road - St. Clair West Transportation Master Plan
      7. MM35.3 - Authorization to Release Section 37 Funds to Toronto District School Board for Ossington-Old Orchard Junior Public School Playground
      8. MM35.43 - 390 and 440 Dufferin Street - Small Business Incubation Centre
      9. MM35.7 - Request to Amend the 2021 Parks Forestry and Recreation Capital Budget for a Commemorative Plaque in MacGregor Playground
      10. TE26.14 - 386-394 Symington Avenue, 405 Perth Avenue and 17 Kingsley Avenue - Official Plan and Zoning By-law Amendment Application - Request for Direction
      11. IE23.9 - Award of Contract Number 21ECS-LU-01TT to EBC Bessac Canada (FSPSTT) Joint Venture for the Construction of the Fairbank Silverthorn Storm Trunk Tunnel and Micro-Tunneled Storm Collectors for Basement Flooding Protection Program Study Area 3
      12. Fairbank-Silverthorn Storm System Public Meeting
    2. City-Wide Items
      1. PH25.10 - A new Regulatory Framework for Multi-Tenant Houses
      2. EX25.3 - Recommended Tax Design and Steps to implement a Vacant Home Tax in Toronto
      3. Affordable Housing Approvals
      4. EX25.4 - SafeTO: Toronto’s Ten-Year Community Safety and Well-Being Plan
      5. EX25.1 - Recognition Review project Update and Response to the Dundas Street Renaming Petition
      6. IE23.6 - Water Users Consultation on Water Fees, Charges, and Programs
      7. IE23.1 / IE23.2 - Toronto's Net-Zero Emissions Strategy
  2. Other Updates
    1. Compost Days 2021
    2. BIG on Bloor Festival
    3. Dovercourt Community Teaching Garden Program
    4. Oasis Dufferin Community Centre Summertime Christmas BBQ
    5. Canadian Blood Services: Request for Donors
    6. Bikeshare Free Ride Wednesdays - Each Wednesday in July
  3. Recent Announcements
    1. City Council approves SafeTO 10-year Community Safety and Well-Being Plan
    2. City Council approves bold strategy to reduce emissions from existing buildings to net zero by 2050, updates Toronto Green Standard
    3. City Council approves renaming Dundas Street
    4. Toronto City Council repeals some COVID-19 bylaws ahead of Step Three reopening
    5. City Council approves framework for Vacant Home Tax to increase housing supply in Toronto
    6. City Council takes action to implement the HousingTO 2020-2030 Action Plan
    7. City of Toronto to start producing renewable natural gas from Green Bin organic waste

City Council Updates


Local Items at the July Council Meeting

TE26.58 - Traffic Control Signals and Turn Prohibitions - Dufferin Street and Lindsay Avenue

As you know, Dufferin Street is one of the most travelled roadways in our community. It is also one of the most challenging in terms of safety for pedestrians, cyclists and motorists. I am committed and have been working hard to address the concerns we all share about Dufferin Street.

Working with City staff, I have ensured that actions are being taken to make sure that residents of our community know they are safe travelling on Dufferin Street. Most recently, at the July City Council meeting, I had approved a motion that implements two more of those promised commitments. These included authorization to install traffic control signals at Dufferin Street and Lindsay Avenue, as well as approving a measure to prohibit northbound and southbound right turns on red at all times at that same intersection.
In addition to the above commitments, a Community Safety Zone between Bloor Street West and College Street has also now been approved and implemented, allowing the City to install Automated Speed Enforcement cameras in the area. This speed enforcement technology will compliment standard speed enforcement options. The cameras are part of our City's Vision Zero Campaign focused on reducing traffic-related fatalities and serious injuries on Toronto’s streets.


MM35.1 -1117 Queen Street West - former Canada Post Building

As you may know, postal services at the Canada Post building at 1117 Queen Street West were discontinued over a year ago. Canada Post, a federal crown corporation owned by the Government of Canada, declared the building as surplus to their needs. Since 2017, when Canada Post began reviewing their use of the building, I have been advocating that it be made available to our community and City for a use that would provide public space, including a potential arts and culture hub. Last month in June, Canada Post transferred control of the building to their real estate division for sale on the open market, essentially to the highest bidder. As you can imagine this is very disappointing for all of us. I have written and conveyed to our Member of Parliament my concerns about the sale of this building and I know she did reach out to the federal minister responsible for Canada Post to ask that the sale be delayed or stopped. Unfortunately, Canada Post is pressing ahead with the sale. If this sale does in fact move forward, I will continue to advocate for publicly available space at this location regardless of who eventually purchases the building and site from Canada Post. After over three years of advocacy it is as noted very disappointing that the Canada Post would forge ahead with this sale.

From our end as a City, at Council last week I successfully moved a motion to direct the City Manager to request that the Minister of Public Services and Procurement Canada instruct Canada Post to immediately halt the proposed sale of this site, as well as to examine and take measures to retain the building in public ownership for the purpose of establishing a cultural and arts hub for the neighbouring community and the City at large.

I will continue to do all that I can to advocate with respect to community uses as this location.


MM35.42 - Musician Rehearsal Spaces in the City of Toronto

I moved this motion because live music performances are among the most significantly impacted sectors of the Toronto economy during the pandemic. Since March 2020, musicians, and the venues that support them, have essentially been unable to perform or rehearse in the City.

During this period in areas such as the Geary neighbourhood in our community, there has been increasing pressure with respect to availability of rehearsal space for music. Indeed, while difficult to quantify exactly across the entirety of the City, it is very clear that rehearsal space is under threat and diminishing quickly. In the absence of this rehearsal space, musicians will not be able to rehearse for live venue performances in a sector that has already been impacted enormously. It is essential that this rehearsal space be protected, encouraged and increased or the sector will be subject to even more significant pressures than they are currently experiencing and expect to endure for the foreseeable future.


CC35.21 - 900 Dufferin Street - Official Plan Amendment and Zoning By-law Amendment Application - Request for Directions

City Staff provided Council with a Request for Directions report on the proposed redevelopment of the northern section of the Dufferin Mall. The proposal includes a new street and public park, and four towers ranging in height from 14 storeys to 39 storeys. It was first received in summer 2019, a preliminary report and community consultation meeting followed in winter 2020  and the developer appealed the application to the Local Planning and Appeals Tribunal (LPAT) around this time.

Since then, I have been working closely with local community stakeholder Working Group which my office formed to include residents associations such as Build a Better Bloor Dufferin, community service providers and members of the local small business community. The close work with the community Working Group has been vitally important to inform and guide the City's negotiations with the developer. The LPAT hearing is scheduled in October and I will continue to share updates on this application as they are made publicly available.


TE26.31 - City-initiated Bloor Street: St. Helen's Avenue to Perth Avenue Planning Framework

I had initiated this study in the context of increasing development pressures in the area. Before development can occur, it is critically important that the community comes together and plans for growth with a special focus on the services and amenities that can accompany it. Consultations began at the end of 2020 and continued throughout 2021 in order to inform the draft planning framework. Within this framework, there are sections outlining principles and directions related to the public realm (parks, road and trail networks), community services and facilities, built form and much more. Many of you have emailed my office with your comments on this draft framework, and these will be taken into account as we look forward to reviewing further work by city staff related to the draft official plan amendments and site specific plans set to come back for review in Q4 2021.


GL24.13 - Acquisition of 10 Properties on Old Weston Road - St. Clair West Transportation Master Plan

The acquisition of these properties along Old Weston Road is part of the larger St. Clair West Transportation Master Plan. This plan will improve and extend major transportation routes in the area. This includes a major extension to Davenport Road, a widening of St. Clair West, as well as various additional crossings and street improvements across the railway.



MM35.3 - Authorization to Release Section 37 Funds to Toronto District School Board for Ossington-Old Orchard Junior Public School Playground

In moving this motion, we had Council approve a one-time transfer of $205,000 in Section 37 funds (funds secured from development projects) be directed towards the Toronto District School Board for improvements at the Ossington-Old Orchard Junior Public School playground. These funds will be used for a new asphalt walkway around the playing field for an upgraded run/walk/bike path; a new sand pit; a new Inclusive and Accessible Playground; a Natural Play Area; and upgraded basketball courts. These improvements will increase the quality of time spent outdoors for children in our community.


MM35.43 - 390 and 440 Dufferin Street - Small Business Incubation Centre

The properties at 390-440 Dufferin Street and 41 Alma Avenue were the subject of a settlement in 2016. The settlement allowed redevelopment of the site's single-storey light industrial workshops for three 9 to 13 storey mixed-use buildings containing residential, retail and employment uses. In June 2019, the City selected a sub-lessee and operator for the Small Business
Incubation Centre, with a proposal to create an innovation hub for hardware manufacturing and prototyping supporting Toronto's thriving tech sector. The challenging circumstances surrounding COVID-19 in 2020 and 2021 have resulted in disruptions to the timelines of this project, and additional time is required to revisit the business model and potential tenants for the space to determine if the City can commit to a lease.


MM35.7 - Request to Amend the 2021 Parks Forestry and Recreation Capital Budget for a Commemorative Plaque in MacGregor Playground

I have been working with a group of local residents to recognize the history of the historic Rope Walk, and as such I have requested that a new commemorative plaque be installed in MacGregor Playground. The long laneway between Lansdowne Avenue and St. Clarens Avenue, south of Bloor Street West, was associated with the rope-making industry for more than 60 years. This approximately 550-metre linear space was used for decades as a “rope walk” — an outdoor facility for braiding raw textiles into twine, string, and rope.

Mention of this rope walk appears as early as 1868. While no photos exist of the Dominion Steam Rope Factory, the rope walk buildings appeared on maps of Brockton as late as 1924 -- and the location of the factory can still be noted in the modern city grid.

The Lansdowne–St. Clarens rope walk was operated by the Dominion Steam Rope Factory, a company owned by Archibald MacGregor -- the namesake of MacGregor Playground.


TE26.14 - 386-394 Symington Avenue, 405 Perth Avenue and 17 Kingsley Avenue - Official Plan and Zoning By-law Amendment Application - Request for Direction

The application proposes a building with low-rise, mid-rise and tall building components, and consists of a 17-storey tower located at the south end of Perth Avenue, an 8-storey portion fronting onto Symington Avenue
and a 4-storey portion along the east side of Perth Avenue and the south side of Kingsley Avenue. There are 375 proposed dwelling units, including 6 live-work units located at ground level facing Symington Avenue. 

This application was originally submitted in October 2015 and appealed to the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal (LPAT) in May 2017. City Council accepted a settlement offer from the applicant in May 2018 (Item CC41.9).

A revised application was endorsed by the Toronto and East York Community Council, as well as City Council. The development, containing a total of 375 dwelling units and 185 parking spaces, is a combination of an 8-storey building facing Symington Avenue, a 17-storey tower at the south end Perth Avenue, and a 4-storey component with townhouse style units along the east side of Perth Avenue. The proposal represents a refined version of a planned development previously approved by the Local Planning Appeal Tribunal in December 2018. As part of the revised plan, I secured an additional Section 37 contribution of $300,000 for community facility improvements in the area.


IE23.9 - Award of Contract Number 21ECS-LU-01TT to EBC Bessac Canada (FSPSTT) Joint Venture for the Construction of the Fairbank Silverthorn Storm Trunk Tunnel and Micro-Tunneled Storm Collectors for Basement Flooding Protection Program Study Area 3

The City of Toronto, with support from the Government of Canada, is moving forward with a major investment to help protect against basement flooding in the Fairbank-Silverthorn community. In the summer of 2021, the City will begin constructing a new three-kilometre-long storm trunk sewer that will collect, store and convey stormwater (rainwater and melted snow) from the area to Black Creek. Upgrades will also be made by constructing more than 17 kilometres of local storm sewers that will connect to the new storm trunk sewer. Once complete, the new sewer system will reduce the impacts of heavy rainfall to 4,645 homes from sewer backups and provide flood protection to a 140-hectare area.

The recommended infrastructure upgrades that were identified through the Class Environmental Assessment to alleviate the recurrent basement flooding in Area 3 included the following:
• A new, 2.5 kilometre long and 3.0 metre diameter Storm Trunk Tunnel, to be tunneled from the east boundary of the Study Area westerly to an outlet in Black Creek,
• Approximately 9 kilometres of new storm collectors of various sizes,
• Two underground combined sewer overflow storage tanks, and
• Approximately 500 Inlet Control Devices installed in catch basins to control storm water entering combined sewers

This motion outlines the award of the construction contract for the Fairbank Silverthorn Project going forward.


Fairbank-Silverthorn Storm System Public Meeting

There will be a public meeting on July 29th from 6:00pm to 8:00pm. You may find more information at Toronto.ca/fairbank or below in the attached notices. 


City-Wide Items

PH25.10 - A new Regulatory Framework for Multi-Tenant Houses

The regulation and standardization of Multi-Tenant Houses across the City of Toronto is an important piece in our City's long-term housing strategy. Multi-Tenant houses, sometimes referred to as Rooming Houses, are often seen as a deeply affordable option for new residents in our city -- whether they have recent arrived in Canada, have moved to our city to begin a new career, or are here to study at one of our many world-class colleges and universities. These individuals often have no other options, it is no secret that the cost of housing in our city is high -- and these multi-tenant houses provide an affordable means of entry.

Multi-tenant housing has been successful in areas where it is regulated by current city by-laws, notably in Parkdale. The proposed multi-tenant housing framework is proven to be successful, as it retains the affordable character of these units, while also ensuring that tenants feel safe and secure in their registered homes. Despite the fact that some parts of our city continue to not allow legal and registered rooming houses -- they continue to exist. The only option going forward is to ensure that Toronto standardizes multi-tenant housing regulations so that residents feel safe in their homes, and welcome in their communities.

This item was deferred for a final decision at the September meeting of City Council to allow for more consultation and review.

I will continue to advocate for the approval of standardized multi-tenant housing across Toronto.


EX25.3 - Recommended Tax Design and Steps to implement a Vacant Home Tax in Toronto

As Chair of the Planning and Housing Committee, I have always advocated for the use of every tool we have to increase the availability of affordable housing in our City. In addition to many other key initiatives, the implementation of a Vacant Home Tax in Toronto will free-up already existing, currently vacant units that can and should be made available for people to live in across our City.

The goal of this policy is not to secure more revenue but rather to incentivize property owners who choose to keep units vacant to free up these spaces for residential occupancy. This program has been successful already in cities like Vancouver -- opening up thousands of units for immediate rental. The potential for success here in Toronto is significant.

In addition to the initial motion for a 1% Vacant Home Tax to commence on January 1st 2022, I successfully moved an amendment to ensure that by the end of 2023, the Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer and the Executive Director of the Housing Secretariat report back to City Council with an update on the implementation of the Vacant Home Tax, as well as anything learned from other jurisdictions who have implemented a similar tax. This report will include recommendations for any required changes to the Toronto Vacant Homes Tax program.

You may find additional information in the City's press release here.


Affordable Housing Approvals

This City Council meeting approved 1976 affordable housing units this past week including:

• Up to 1016 affordable rental units recommended for Open Door incentives
• 498-542 affordable rental units through Housing Now zoning approvals
• 350 affordable units through Sec 37 agreements for private applications
• 51 Rapid Housing modular units with recommendation for a Ministerial Zoning Order (a planning measure to expedite a plan) request
• 17 net new affordable rental units through a rental demolition and replacement application

In addition to this, over $8 million in Section 37 (revenue from developments) contributions for affordable housing were also secured.

The approval of these units is a huge step towards our affordable housing goals. Since December 2020 the City has opened 244 new supportive homes and currently 82 projects in the City's affordable rental development pipeline will create 10,676 new permanently affordable rental homes. Over the next 12 months the City is aiming to make available at least 1,248 new permanent affordable and supportive housing opportunities.

You may find additional information about our HousingTO 2020-2030 Action Plan in the City's press release here.


EX25.4 - SafeTO: Toronto’s Ten-Year Community Safety and Well-Being Plan

SafeTO is a comprehensive Ten-Year Community Safety and Well-Being Plan that reimagines core elements of community safety and well-being in order to make a shift from a reliance on reactive emergency responses to a culture of proactive prevention. SafeTO inspires us to think differently, work collaboratively across sectors, communities and governments, and to bring about a safe Toronto that promotes and celebrates the well-being and resilience of all residents.

SafeTO measures include:

• Expanding the definition of community safety beyond crime or policing to include well-being,
• Redefining what trauma means and deepening the ability of the City and its
partners to be informed by it and respond to it,
• Enhancing our ability to act early and advance preventative approaches,
• Developing innovative mechanisms to use multi-sector data to inform decision making and integrate investments,
• Implementing an effective multi-sector governance structure that brings our critical partners into coordinated leadership and action, and
• Committing to a long-term vision of community safety and well-being and a comprehensive plan to realize it.

Lessons learned from the Short-term Community Safety Pilot will be used to inform the SafeTO Implementation Plan which will return to Council for further consideration in December 2021.


EX25.1 - Recognition Review project Update and Response to the Dundas Street Renaming Petition

City Council voted to approve a proposal to rename Dundas Street and other civic assets with the Dundas name in an effort to promote inclusion and reconciliation with marginalized communities.

The adoption of the recommendations to rename Dundas street are part of a larger commitment to confront anti-Black racism, advance truth, reconciliation, and justice, as well as creating an overall more inclusive and equitable city. City Staff will report back to the Executive Committee in Q2 of 2022, bringing forward potential new names for Dundas Street and other City-owned assets bearing the name. The Community Advisory Committee has led the renaming process, and consists of Black and Indigenous leaders, as well as representatives of the diverse communities living and working along Dundas street. This committee will develop potential new names, as well as a transition plan to assist residents through the renaming process.


IE23.6 - Water Users Consultation on Water Fees, Charges, and Programs

This week, I joined my colleagues on City Council and voted in favour of the recommendation to receive a report on the implementation of a stormwater charge for all property classes. This report is set to come back to City council in 2023 with further recommendations on the feasibility of implementing these administrative charges. 

These stormwater charges would be combined with incentives for those who implement their own management strategies, and charges would apply to large properties who contribute disproportionally to stormwater runoff such as parking lots. As it stands right now, charges are based off of water usage rather than water generation -- meaning that parking lots who use no water but generate runoff pay nothing, and industrial sites or homes who use water but generate little runoff pay higher fees.

As you may be aware, basement flooding has been an increasing challenge for residents across Davenport and the City more generally in recent years. By implementing these recommendations, disproportionate generators of stormwater runoff would be incentivized to improve their properties by planting trees, other vegetation, or committing to different runoff management strategies. This would help alleviate the pressure we currently see in our community.


IE23.1 / IE23.2 - Toronto's Net-Zero Emissions Strategy

The realities of Climate Change are all around us, especially in regard to the increasing frequency of extreme weather events and the City is moving forward with the TransformTO Net Zero strategy to meet these challenges.

In 2017, City Council unanimously adopted TransformTO, the City of Toronto's comprehensive climate action strategy for achieving dramatic city-wide greenhouse gas emissions reductions of 80 percent by 2050 and associated co-benefits of health, local economic impact, social equity, and resilience. In 2019, in recognition of the increasing need for accelerated climate action, City Council declared a climate emergency and increased Toronto's city-wide greenhouse gas emissions reduction goal to net zero emissions by 2050 or sooner.

At this meeting of City Council, two Net-Zero items were adopted:
 IE23.1 - Net Zero Existing Buildings Strategy
 IE23.2 - Building Net Zero Emissions City Buildings - Corporate Real Estate Management's Net Zero Carbon Plan

The Net Zero Existing Buildings Strategy acknowledges that existing buildings remain Toronto's largest source of emissions, accounting for about 55 percent of total community-wide emissions. Additionally, natural gas represents 91 percent of all emissions from Toronto's buildings, and almost 97 percent of emissions from residential buildings in particular, making the reduction of natural gas use a critical focus of emissions reduction efforts. This report outlines the City's strategy on the emissions from existing buildings -- with recommendations to reduce this through actions such as retrofits, renewable energy credits, and switching to a clean energy grid.

 


Other Updates

Compost Days 2021

Summer is here, and a new season of greening and growing is kicking off in gardens around Davenport! Join in at our upcoming compost days where we are offering freshly composted soil for your garden. Please bring your own containers, a shovel, and your green thumbs!

 

 


BIG on Bloor Festival

The BIG on Bloor Festival opens its 14th year beginning on July 24th with the launch of several art installations scattered throughout the Bloordale neighborhood; Bloor Street West, Dufferin to Lansdowne. Celebrating community magic, creativity, and diversity through arts and culture, while showing love to the local storefronts that make the strip so special.

Projects will explore the concept of "patchwork”, exploring how layers of community can come together to create, and in doing so, discover how our differences can make a communal piece so beautiful and unique. PATCHWORK asks: what similarities can strangers reveal when they work towards the same goal? By creating in parallel, new connections can emerge, despite the discord we each may have faced. As you move through the art projects of Bloordale, you are invited to explore what new connections, mosaics and medleys may emerge.

Additionally, my Community Office will be hosting one of these exhibits! I encourage you to stop by 1240 Bloor Street West to see what is there!

The Festival will last from July 24th until August 2nd, and is free to all who wish to attend. For more information, see here


Dovercourt Community Teaching Garden Program

I have been working with the Dovercourt Boys & Girls Club and the community to revitalize the McGregor Playground Garden. I am delighted at the progress that has been made, and I'm excited for the rest of the community to share in its activities and joy.

As of Saturday July 17th, the Dovercourt Boys & Girls Club has begun a weekly program that will take place every Saturday from 9:30am to 11:30am at McGregor Park. For more information, see the poster below:

 


Oasis Dufferin Community Centre Summertime Christmas BBQ

Join the Oasis Dufferin Community Centre for a Summertime Christmas barbeque event on Saturday, August 14! Clear your calendars, because they've planned an afternoon filled with food, fun and a chance to learn more about how Oasis will continue to support our community.

From 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. they will be grilling up free hot dogs, and with a Christmas treat bake sale and tables for the kids, there’s something fun for everyone. If you’re interested in finding out what exactly it is Oasis does, now’s your chance to experience a walk-through tour of our history, the programs we run, and what day-to-day life is like at the community centre.

Come on down to meet your neighbours, enjoy the barbeque, and have a little bit of Summertime Christmas fun!

Location: Oasis Dufferin Community Centre, corner of Dufferin and Hallam St.
Date: August 14th, 2021
Time: 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.


Canadian Blood Services: Request for Donors

As you may have heard Canada’s blood supply needs a boost this summer following a surge in demand and blood donors in Toronto are needed more than ever. 

With the pandemic ongoing, the need for blood has not stopped. There are several appointment spots available at Canadian Blood Services' Yonge and Bloor, College Street and King Street West locations.

As we move into the summer months, Canadian Blood Services is urging eligible blood donors to book and keep their appointments to support lifesaving care for patients. Missed or cancelled appointments are difficult for us to fill. If you make an appointment, try to keep it. If you are unable to make it to your appointment, please cancel it so they can find someone else to take your place or consider re-booking in coming months

For more information about locations and hours, see here

 


Bikeshare Free Ride Wednesdays - Each Wednesday in July

Bike Share Toronto riders will ride for free every Wednesday in July. Riders can take out a bike for up to 30 minutes, return the bike to any station, and take out another bike for an additional free 30-minute ride for a 24-hour period. In addition to providing free rides in July, Bike Share Toronto staff coordinated with the City's ActiveTO program to ensure people can get outside while still being physically distanced by activating “Valet Stations” around popular ActiveTO routes. The stations are staffed with Community Ambassadors who have extra bikes and docking points to ensure hassle-free riding. Learn more about Free Ride Wednesdays on the Bike Share website.


Recent Announcements (July 14 - July 22)

Municipal

July 14 - City Council approves SafeTO 10-year Community Safety and Well-Being Plan
July 14 - City Council approves bold strategy to reduce emissions from existing buildings to net zero by 2050, updates Toronto Green Standard
July 14 - City Council approves renaming Dundas Street
July 15 - Toronto City Council repeals some COVID-19 bylaws ahead of Step Three reopening
July 15 - City Council approves framework for Vacant Home Tax to increase housing supply in Toronto
July 16 - City Council takes action to implement the HousingTO 2020-2030 Action Plan
July 20 - City of Toronto to start producing renewable natural gas from Green Bin organic waste
July 21 - City of Toronto opening all City-run COVID-19 vaccination clinics to walk-ins, youth now eligible for walk-in vaccination

Provincial

July 15 - Ontario Easing Restrictions in Congregate Care Settings
July 16 - Ontario and Canada Announce Advanced Plans for Yonge North Subway Extension
July 21 - Ontario Making it Easier to Renew Documents

Federal

July 16 - Canada, Ontario, City of Toronto, and partners invest over $35.9 million in the Tamil Community Centre in Scarborough
July 19 - Government of Canada announces easing of border measures for fully vaccinated travellers
July 21 - Installation Ceremony of Ms. Mary Simon as the 30th Governor General of Canada


City Hall Address:

Toronto City Hall
100 Queen Street West, Suite C42
Toronto, ON M5H 2N2

Open: Monday - Friday 8:30AM - 4:30PM

Email: [email protected]

Phone: 416-392-7012

Fax: 416-392-7957

Constituency Office:

1240 Bloor Street West
Toronto, ON M6H 1N5

Open: Wednesday, Thursday and Friday
1pm - 6pm

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