'Close the Gap' Housing Campaign

Ana__gene_and_bud_at_poster_launch.JPGOver the last decade Toronto has been trying to quietly address a major issue facing our city: affordable housing.

Yet, we have nearly 90,000 households on a waiting list for affordable housing, we have provincial funding that isn't keeping up with demand and we have federal assistance that is steadily declining to reach zero by 2031. Being quiet isn't working; it's time to get loud.

For this reason, in September I launched the Close the Housing Gap campaign, along with Toronto Community Housing, to persuade the federal and provincial governments to continue funding social housing at existing levels and provide new, long-term funding for social housing capital repairs.

An important part of this campaign is getting Torontonians aware and involved in this important discussion. To let residents know about the campaign, we created posters that went up in 136 bus shelters throughout Toronto – with additional posters on parliament hill in Ottawa.

As the campaign co-chair, I have been working closely with Toronto Community Housing and the City to put people first by fixing Toronto's social housing, but there is still a housing gap which can only be closed through new and ongoing funding from Ottawa and Queen’s Park. Raising property taxes is not the answer.

But we need your support. Please add your voice to campaign and sign our online petition HERE calling on Ottawa and Queen's Park to Close the Housing Gap.

The Close the Housing Gap campaign calls for:Housing_gap.png

  • the federal government to stop withdrawing money from social housing and instead reinvest it back into social housing capital repairs
  • the provincial government to treat social housing providers fairly when paying social assistance rent rates, and
  • Ottawa and Queen’s Park to provide fully-funded, long-term housing strategies.

I encourage you to learn more about the campaign HERE and join your voice with ours in calling on Ottawa and Queen's Park to provide their fair share of the millions of dollars needed to maintain Toronto’s aging social housing stock in good repair.

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